A daily break in your day to celebrate our salvation in Yeshua (Jesus) and our abundant life through the Torah


How Can I Observe the Sabbath Without a Congregation?

Observing the SabbathI hear this question a lot.  In fact, I used to ask this question a lot.  You may feel the pull of the Holy Spirit to observe the Sabbath.  You may find that your heart and perspective toward the scriptures, the Israelites of old and the land of Israel today is different than those you currently worship with at church on Sunday.

But now what?  You don’t know anyone else who is pursuing these things; there’s no gathering on the Sabbath that you can be part of.  How can you keep the Sabbath on your own?  What should you be doing?  What about the command of assembling with others on the Sabbath? Read the rest of this page »

Keeping the Fall Feasts & Holy Days: When are they and how are they relevant today?

The Lord’s Holy Days, Feast Dates, Jewish Feasts, Appointed Times, Mo’edim — whatever term you use, don’t miss these days!  As a Christian seeking more intimacy in my walk with Yeshua, learning about, experiencing and keeping these feasts (including the Sabbath) has brought me not only into deeper intimacy with him, but God has showered me with new understanding, unexpected blessings, strengthened faith and fresh excitement daily.  I highly recommend it!

Included here is a list of my blog posts about the Fall Feasts.   Read the rest of this page »

Feast of Trumpets: “A day of complete rest for remembering”

Blow the ShofarThis year the Feast of Trumpets (also called Rosh Hashanah) begins on the evening of September 14, 2015.  We put aside our work and gather with other believers, share a meal, blow our shofar, present an offering and worship just as the Lord commanded us in Leviticus 23.

But Leviticus 23:24 also tells us this is to be “a day of complete rest for remembering.”  Remembering what, it doesn’t say.  In fact none of the references to the Feast of Trumpets tell us what we’re remembering.

To get some perspective, let’s go back in time about 3,500 years when the observance of this day was first commanded.  Read the rest of this page »

Preparing for Yom Kippur: 40 Days of Repentance, Part 2

Alignment, Fall FeastsIn Part 1, we looked at the Hebrew understanding of the month of Elul, which begins 40 days before Yom Kippur (The Day of Atonement).  From the days of the Israelites in the wilderness, this period has emerged as a Season of Repentance, specifically repentance from idolatry, and originally the idolatrous Golden Calf.

For us it may not be a statue, figurine or carved image, but idolatry can take many forms.  Repentance is an ongoing process of discovery of sin in our lives and realignment with God’s ways.  In my own journey I’ve found four places where idolatry can hide and have watched God realign my life as I walk through each one.  We’ve discussed the first two: discontentment and following my own plans.  Let’s continue with the third:

Fear Read the rest of this page »

The Day of Atonement: Yeshua Already Paid for That

Crucifixion“…and forgive us our debts as we forgive those who trespass against us.” (Matt. 6:12)
…”Forgive, and you will be forgiven.” (Luke 6:37)
Forgiveness:  Relinquishing our desire to punish another for their offenses. (Dr. Jerry Cook)

Easy to understand, hard to apply.  But The Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur in Hebrew) is all about forgiveness – God’s forgiveness of man, and man’s forgiveness of others.  Yom Kippur (literally translated the Day of Atonements) begins at sunset on September 23, 2015 and is the sixth in the seven Biblical Feasts.  It commemorates God’s annual forgiveness of the Israelites as a nation and God’s forgiveness of all through Yeshua’s death.  Likewise, it’s a time when we are to forgive others. Read the rest of this page »


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