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Month 6 – Elul: Preparation for the Day of Atonement

On the Hebrew calendar, Elul is the sixth month of the year. On the 10th day of last month – the month of Av – we began the Season of Comfort.  The season of comfort continues seven weeks, until the first day of next month, which is Tishrei 1, the same day as the Feast of Trumpets. So we have seven weeks in the Season of Comfort, Av 10 to Tishrei 1.

Elul 1 also marks 40 days until the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur), which is always on Tishrei 10.

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Month 5 – Av: Mourning Turns to Joy

The Month of Av is the fifth month of the year on the Hebrew calendar. We are still in the season of Judgment & Exile as the month of Av begins.  But during Av, the seasons change.  Similar to the Gregorian month of March, we have the expression “In like a Lion, out like a Lamb,” so the month of Av can be broken into two phases.

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Month 3 – Sivan: Return, Revelation & Blessing

The month of Sivan is the third month of the year on the Hebrew calendar.  The rabbis have called this season the “Season of Revelation,” primarily referring to the revelation of the Torah on Mt. Sinai, which most believe was the day of Shavuot/Pentecost.  Shavuot always falls during the month of Sivan.  As Messianic believers we also know the revelation of the Holy Spirit was poured out 1,500 years later on the same day. Read the rest of this page »

Month 2 – Iyar: The Narrow Road Leads to More Revelation

Iyar is the second month on the Hebrew calendar.  During the first month, we’ve experienced Passover, the Feast of Unleavened Bread and the Feast of Firstfruits, and are now going through the Omer Count.

Although it’s growing, there’s still a relatively small group of people observing the feasts and keeping Sabbath compared to the mainstream. We’ve chosen a narrow path.  The Feast of Unleavened Bread that has just completed is a time of distinguishing between leaven and unleavened bread, symbolizing our goal of separating sin from righteousness. The number of people eating this way for a week is pretty small. It’s likely that those currently counting the omer for 49 days is even smaller.  We’re going against the grain.  It’s what I’d call “the narrow path.” Read the rest of this page »

Month 1 – Preparing Ourselves for the Spring Feasts, Part 1

BarleyThe Spring Feasts begin with Passover during the Hebrew month of Nisan.  On the Hebrew calendar, the Feasts always begin during the month of Nisan.  But “Nisan” is a Babylonian name adopted well after the original command to observe Passover.  In looking at the Hebrew name of the month, I found it was actually much more – more than a name or even a month.  It’s a season, a designation, a process – the understanding of which brought all new revelation about the significance of the Spring Feasts. Read the rest of this page »

Month 13 – Adar II: But Wait, There’s More!

There’s more time added on to the Hebrew year, and there’s more that Yehovah wants to teach us about this season.  A 13th month on the Hebrew calendar only happens in leap years, so the 13th month is called Adar II.  While the 13th month is not explicitly mentioned in the Bible, the month of Adar or the 12th month, is mentioned eight times in scripture.  Here’s how a leap year works and what these eight scriptures reveal about this season. Read the rest of this page »

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