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Why Count the Omer?

The Omer Count always begins at sundown on the Feast of First Fruits, and ends on the day before Pentecost (Shavuot) – 7 weeks, 49 days.  (See the dates here.)

So what’s an Omer?  Why would Yehovah want us to count it?  Is it still relevant today?  Those were my questions, and these links discuss the answers I found in my search.

If you’ve never counted the omer, I encourage you to begin the journey and see how Yehovah answers these questions for you.  If you’re counting the omer and looking for fresh insight, I pray He will use this teaching to enlighten your path.  I hope you will leave a comment about what he’s taught you as well.

2021 Omer Count Calendar

 

Month 7 – The Feast of Trumpets & the New Moon

shofar-newmoonWhat’s the only feast that falls on a new moon? Feast of Trumpets! The Feast of Trumpets always begins on Tishrei 1, the beginning of the seventh month on the Hebrew calendar.  It’s always marked by a new moon.

Genesis 1:14 tells us:

Then God said, “Let there be lights in the expanse of the heavens to separate the day from the night, and let them be for signs and for seasons and for days and years;”

Read the rest of this page »

Month 6 – Elul: Preparation for the Day of Atonement

On the Hebrew calendar, Elul is the sixth month of the year. On the 10th day of last month – the month of Av – we began the Season of Comfort.  The season of comfort continues seven weeks, until the first day of next month, which is Tishrei 1, the same day as the Feast of Trumpets. So we have seven weeks in the Season of Comfort, Av 10 to Tishrei 1.

Elul 1 also marks 40 days until the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur), which is always on Tishrei 10.

Read the rest of this page »

Month 5 – Av: Mourning Turns to Joy

The Month of Av is the fifth month of the year on the Hebrew calendar. We are still in the season of Judgment & Exile as the month of Av begins.  But during Av, the seasons change.  Similar to the Gregorian month of March, we have the expression “In like a Lion, out like a Lamb,” so the month of Av can be broken into two phases.

Read the rest of this page »

Month 3 – Sivan: Return, Revelation & Blessing

The month of Sivan is the third month of the year on the Hebrew calendar.  The rabbis have called this season the “Season of Revelation,” primarily referring to the revelation of the Torah on Mt. Sinai, which most believe was the day of Shavuot/Pentecost.  Shavuot always falls during the month of Sivan.  As Messianic believers we also know the revelation of the Holy Spirit was poured out 1,500 years later on the same day. Read the rest of this page »

Month 2 – Iyar: The Narrow Road Leads to More Revelation

Iyar is the second month on the Hebrew calendar.  During the first month, we’ve experienced Passover, the Feast of Unleavened Bread and the Feast of Firstfruits, and are now going through the Omer Count.

Although it’s growing, there’s still a relatively small group of people observing the feasts and keeping Sabbath compared to the mainstream. We’ve chosen a narrow path.  The Feast of Unleavened Bread that has just completed is a time of distinguishing between leaven and unleavened bread, symbolizing our goal of separating sin from righteousness. The number of people eating this way for a week is pretty small. It’s likely that those currently counting the omer for 49 days is even smaller.  We’re going against the grain.  It’s what I’d call “the narrow path.” Read the rest of this page »

Month 1 – Preparing Ourselves for the Spring Feasts, Part 1

BarleyThe Spring Feasts begin with Passover during the Hebrew month of Nisan.  On the Hebrew calendar, the Feasts always begin during the month of Nisan.  But “Nisan” is a Babylonian name adopted well after the original command to observe Passover.  In looking at the Hebrew name of the month, I found it was actually much more – more than a name or even a month.  It’s a season, a designation, a process – the understanding of which brought all new revelation about the significance of the Spring Feasts. Read the rest of this page »

Month 13 – Adar II: But Wait, There’s More!

There’s more time added on to the Hebrew year, and there’s more that Yehovah wants to teach us about this season.  A 13th month on the Hebrew calendar only happens in leap years, so the 13th month is called Adar II.  While the 13th month is not explicitly mentioned in the Bible, the month of Adar or the 12th month, is mentioned eight times in scripture.  Here’s how a leap year works and what these eight scriptures reveal about this season. Read the rest of this page »

Month 11 – Shevat: A Month of Preparation for the New Year

hebrew calendarThe Hebrew year has 12 months (13 in a leap year).  A Hebrew month starts when the first sliver of the new moon can be seen on the horizon just after sunset.  The month of Shevat usually begins in January on the Gregorian calendar.  It is the 11th month of the year.  So we’re just about through the whole year at this point.

I want to set the context for this month by looking at the new year coming up on the Hebrew calendar, so we can see where we’re headed. Read the rest of this page »

Month 10 – Tevet: A Contrast of Judgement & Victory

TevetThe month of Tevet is the tenth month on the Hebrew calendar and usually starts in December on the Gregorian calendar.

Similar to weather-related seasons, the Jewish Rabbis have created spiritual seasons that we cycle through during the 12 months on the Hebrew calendar. The Rabbis consider Tevet part of the “Season of Victory.”  This season includes the last half of the month of Kislev, all of Tevet, plus the next two months – a total of 3.5 months (4.5 months during a leap year). Read the rest of this page »

Hanukkah 2021: Sundown November 28 thru Sundown December 6

Happy HanukkahHanukkah – It’s not one of Yehovah’s appointed holy days, not the Jewish Christmas, not even the biggest celebration on the Hebrew calendar.  Sometimes referred to as the “Festival of Lights” or the “Feast of Dedication,” it is mentioned in the Bible as being observed in Yeshua’s day (John 10:22).  It’s the celebration of a victory for the Jews recorded in the book of 1 Maccabees written in the latter part of the 2nd century BC.  Some people would ask, “Why should Christians celebrate Hanukkah; why not just celebrate Christmas?”

An easy question, with a complex answer.  Much has been written and taught on the origins of Christmas, so I won’t reiterate that here.  What is included here are several things I’ve learned about Yehovah by observing Hanukkah.  While it is optional, it certainly can be a wonderful focal point for meditation and revelation.

Hanukkah? Chanukah? And Why Does the Date Keep Changing?
Hanukkah…A Time of Re-Dedication
As Hanukkah’s Candles, We Light up the Darkness
Hanukkah Home Celebration Kit

Happy Hanukkah!

Month 9 – Kislev: A Contrast Of Light & Darkness

Kislev is the ninth month of the year on the Hebrew calendar.

In the Northern Hemisphere, the ninth and tenth months are the darkest of the year – the nights are longer than any other time.  In the Southern Hemisphere, they are the lightest season of the year – the days are longer than any other time.

But the winter solstice always falls this time of year.  The winter solstice is the day the light and dark begin to reverse.  In the Northern hemisphere the days start getting longer; in the Southern hemisphere the nights start getting longer.

It’s a contrast of extremes – It gets darker and darker until, on one day, it stops, and begins to get lighter and lighter.  On our Gregorian calendar that day is always December 21. Read the rest of this page »

Why 40 Years in the Wilderness?

The weekly portion of Sh’lach L’cha, Numbers 13-15 is the account of the 12 men going into the Promised Land to reconnoiter it and come back to report to the people what it’s like. This is the point at which Yehovah decides that the Israelites are going to spend 40 years in the desert.

40 years! How old were you 40 years ago?  It was the beginning of the1980s – What were you doing in 1980s?  A lot has happened since then.  What about ten years later in the 90s?  What were you doing in the at the turn of the century?  Think about everything that’s gone on in just the last ten years.

40 years is almost half of our lifetime. It’s a long time. It seems like a harsh punishment.  Read the rest of this page »

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